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Bringing Kabbalah Into Daily Life
These sets of affirmations, based on the ten sefirot, or vessels, of kabbalah, can be used as a daily practice.
By Tamar Frankiel


Excerpted from "The Gift of Kabbalah" by Tamar Frankiel with permission of Jewish Lights Publishing.

Editor's note: These affirmations are based on the
ten sefirot, the divine energies that Kabbalists believe are manifested in every aspect of creation. The sefirot are: keter (crown), chochmah (wisdom), binah (understanding), chesed (expansiveness), gevurah (restraint), tiferet (splendor), netzach (perseverance), hod (surrender), yesod (foundation), and Malkuth (manifestations).

An affirmation is a way of creating a positive mindset. Many of us have, over the years, created mental habits that are like ruts in a drivewayŚwe simply go down them without thinking because they're the path of least resistance. Affirmations create new mental habits, a new and more beautiful and expansive road for our minds to travel.

One kind of affirmation is an "I am" meditation. These are specifically about yourself. They work best if they are framed in a way that expresses your being, not your doing. In other words, they should be "I am" statements, not "I can" statements. Remember that Anochi, "I am," is the first word spoken by God in giving the revelation at Sinai to the Jewish people. It is the essence of the sefirah of Chochmah. When you say "I am," you should try to use words that express your eternal essence, not your temporary frame of mind or feelings. (In daily life, this means it is better to say "I feel tired" rather than "I am tired"; "I feel angry rather than "I am angry," etc.) It's not always necessary to use "I am" for affirmations, but the sense of being-ness should be prominent.

Affirmation 1
This first set of affirmations is designed to set up a positive frame of mind, which will allow you to see yourself in the context of the Divine creative energy that sustains the universe at all times, along with the framework created by the Tree of Life of the sefirot. You may wish to use them individually or say them as a series, after your morning devotions. After you become familiar with the ideas expressed, you may wish to change some of the words so that they feel comfortable.

Keter
I am a spark of God. My essence is Divine.

Chochmah
I emerged from the wild creativity of existence--I am a path worth risking everything for.

Binah
My being--body, mind, and spirit--is aligned with the patterning of the universe. I am a temple for my Divine soul.

Da'at
I am a seeker of higher Divine unity through my mind.

Chesed
I am in touch with the support of the universe, the unconditional love of God.

Gevurah
My limitations and challenges are Divine gifts.

Tiferet
I am a free being, choosing to align my will with God's will.

Netzach
I am a giver, wholeheartedly contributing my effort to creating the world by tending my little part of the universe.

Hod
I am grateful, appreciating and honoring the work of others.

Yesod
I am a channel of transmission, gathering and passing on all that comes to and through me for the good, to other living beings and to the next generation.

Malkhut
I am part of a greater whole, joining with all other beings to express gratitude and praise to the Creator of the universe.

Affirmation 2
Another kind of affirmation expresses a positive view of the world around you, resetting your world view as you might reset your watch. When we feel victimized or want to blame someone, when we feel disappointed or don't understand why our plans aren't working out, or when we feel overwhelmed, this kind of affirmation can be very helpful. The following list is also correlated with the sefirot, to help you at difficult times, when you are experiencing conflicts or when you are having difficulties in seeing the good in what is happening.

Keter
Master of the universe, may Your Will be done.

Chochmah
This world is being infused with Divine intent at every moment.

Binah
Every pattern or design I see is an aspect of Divine reality, revealing itself to me.

Da'at
The path of unification is open to me at any moment by settling my mind.

Chesed
I join the outpouring of Divine love by performing acts of chesed and thinking kind thoughts.

Gevurah
What happens ois all from the Creator. Now I have an opportunity to re-examine my connection to my spiritual path.

Tiferet
God connects to the world through me; my purpose on earth is being fulfilled even though that may not be apparent to me.

Netzach
My creativity is valued and cherished in the ultimate scheme of Divine unfolding.

Hod
I am willing to sacrifice my personal desires for the general good and for the glory of the Divine.

Yesod
God is Master of time, Creator of coincidences, and Lord of history--whether I can see it or not, there is an evolving design.

Malkhut
God's will is manifest right here and now; everything is exactly as it is supposed to be.

 

Tree of Life

THE WORDS BELOW COME FROM MANY

SOURCES & DIFFERENT WEBSITES:

See how there are different spellings of Kabbalah as well as different ideas and sources:

I have not edited these.

Many people are studying the Kabbalah now as they search for their roots - the origins and greater understanding of creation - and the messages of God. Kabbalah can be spelled several different ways - each seemingly correct. The energies of the letters in the Hebrew alphabet move beyond the physical. The information in the Kabbalah follows the patterns of the sacred geometry that forms our reality. Sacred geometry - the star tetrahedron - which is the Star of David - counter rotating fields linked to the spirals of movement of consciousness from one level of reality to another. This is part of Merkaba - rotation and movement of consciousness. Our consciousness is shifting into or returning to - a higher harmonic. We see this symbolically - metaphorically - as the creation of a new Torah - Scroll - Book of Life - etc.

Humanity will shed the physical body as it evolves into a state of higher faster moving consciousness - that of higher light. The physical experience is about duality played out through the alchemy of thought to experience two things: Linear Time and Emotion - neither of which exist beyond the physical realms. Your soul should be gearing you for these changes. Your 'inner voice' should be telling you to go on a quest to get answers that will help you understand this transition of consciousness - alchemy of mind. We are close.

Kabala is one of many tools that are helping people understand the current transition.

 

The word 'Qabbalah' finds its root in the Hebrew word 'Qibel' meaning 'to receive by oral tradition'.

Qabbalah refers to an oral tradition of esoteric or secret knowledge concerning 'essentially' the mysteries of Nature, and more overtly, the hidden teachings concerning the Hebrew Torah. The Torah is, of course, the first five books of what Christians call the Old Testament, and the oldest surviving of the Judaic liturgical texts.

The Kabala is an ancient Hebrew mystical system of thought. It is a symbolic representation of the path the Divine followed in the creation of the universe, including man. It is, by definition, humanity's process of returning to divinity along the same path.

Kabbala, also spelled KABALA, KABBALAH, CABALA, CABBALA, OR CABBALAH, is an esoteric Jewish mysticism as it appeared in the 12th and following centuries. Kabbala has always been essentially an oral tradition in that initiation into its doctrines and practices is conducted by a personal guide to avoid the dangers inherent in mystical experiences.

Esoteric Kabbala is also "tradition" inasmuch as it lays claim to secret knowledge of the unwritten Torah (divine revelation) that was communicated by God to Moses and Adam. Though observance of the Law of Moses remained the basic tenet of Judaism, Kabbala provided a means of approaching God directly.

It thus gave Judaism a religious dimension whose mystical approaches to God were viewed by some as dangerously pantheistic and heretical.

The earliest roots of Kabbala are traced to Merkava mysticism. It began to flourish in Palestine in the 1st century AD and had as its main concern ecstatic and mystical contemplation of the divine throne, or "chariot" (merkava), seen in a vision by Ezekiel, the prophet (Ezekiel 1).

 

The earliest known Jewish text on magic and cosmology, Sefer Yetzira ("Book of Creation"), appeared sometime between the 3rd and the 6th century. It explained creation as a process involving the 10 divine numbers (sefirot; see sefira) of God the Creator and the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet.

Taken together, they were said to constitute the "32 paths of secret wisdom."

A major text of early Kabbala was the 12th-century Sefer ha-bahir ("Book of Brightness"), whose influence on the development of Jewish esoteric mysticism and on Judaism in general was profound and lasting.

The Bahir not only interpreted the sefirot as instrumental in creating and sustaining the universe but also introduced into Judaism such notions as the transmigration of souls (gilgul) and strengthened the foundations of Kabbala by providing it with an extensive mystical symbolism.

Spanish Kabbala

In the following century, the Sefer ha-temuna ("Book of the Image") appeared in Spain and advanced the notion of cosmic cycles, each of which provides an interpretation of the Torah according to a divine attribute.

Judaism, consequently, was presented not as a religion of immutable truths but as one for which each cycle, or eon, was said to have a different Torah.

Spain also produced the famous Sefer ha-zohar ("Book of Splendour"), a book that in some circles was invested with a sanctity rivaling that of the Torah itself. It dealt with the mystery of creation and the functions of the sefirot, and it offered mystical speculations about evil, salvation, and the soul.

Following their expulsion from Spain in 1492, the Jews were more than ever taken up with messianic hopes and eschatology, and Kabbala found wide favor.

Lurianic Kabbala. By the mid-16th century the unchallenged centre of Kabbala was Safed, Galilee, where one of the greatest of all Kabbalists, Isaac ben Solomon Luria, spent the last years of his life. According to Gershom Gerhard Scholem, a modern Jewish scholar of Kabbala, Luria's influence was surpassed only by that of the Sefer ha-zohar.

Lurianic Kabbala developed several basic doctrines: the "withdrawal" (tzimtzum) of the divine light, thereby creating primordial space; the sinking of luminous particles into matter (qellipot: "shells"); and a "cosmic restoration" (tikkun) that is achieved by the Jew through an intense mystical life and unceasing struggle against evil. Lurianic Kabbalism was used to justify Shabbetaianism, a Jewish messianic movement of the 17th century.

Lurianic Kabbala also profoundly influenced the doctrines of modern Hasidism, a social and religious movement that began in the 18th century and still flourishes today in small but significant Jewish communities.

The Sefer Zohar or "Book of Splendour" is supposed to be the most authoritative Kabbalistic work, but this massive series of books is so obscure and symbolic as to be practically incomprehensible.

Although traditionally said to date back to the first century C.E., in its present form the Zohar is most likely of 13th Century Spanish vintage, compiled by the Kabbalistic writer Moses de Leon (c.1240-1305) from a combination of his own ideas and contemporary Kabbalistic elements [Gershom Scholem, Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism, chapter 5].

Moses de Leon was a brilliant homilectical rather than a systematic thinker. He was concerned not with formulating a coherent metaphysical system, but with the elaboration and interpretation of verses of scripture from the Torah, often in the form of obscure mystical allegorations.

It was this rich mass of imagery and allegory that the Zohar contains that served as the inspiration for all subsequent generations of Kabbalists.

 

 

The Kabala is presented, symbolically in the form of The Tree of Life.

The Tree contains ten centers called sephiroth, individually sephira, which are connected by 22 paths.

THE SPHERES

 

Sphere 1:
KETER ....CROWN, GOD, INFINITE LIGHT & WISDOM, TOTAL & SUPREME CONSCIOUSNESS

Sphere 2:
CHOHMAN...MALE YANG ENERGIES, PURE ENERGY, SPIRITUAL FORCE, COSMIC FATHER

Sphere 3:
BINAH...YIN ENERGY, COMPASSION, PURE LOVE & UNDERSTANDING, THE COSMIC MOTHER

Sphere 4:
CHESED...THE RULER, MAJESTY, POWER & AUTHORITY, CONSOLIDATOR OF THINGS

Sphere 5:
GEBURAH...THE WARRIOR, SPSERER OF MARS, STRENGTH, JUSTICE, PHYSICAL POWER

Sphere 6:
TIPERETH...THE SUN, HARMONY, BEAUTY, PERFECTION, UNITY, CREATION

Sphere 7:
NEDZACH...THE LOVER, VENUS, ART, CREATIVITY INSPIRATION & EROTIC SPIRITUALITY

Sphere 8:
HOD...THE INTELLECT, MERCURY, COMMUNICATION

Sphere 9:
YESOD...THE MOON, VISION & DEEP MEMORY, THE CYCLES IN & AROUND US, ILLUSION

Sphere10:
MALKUTH...PHYSICAL REALITY, DEATH, PAIN, HEALING

Sphere11:
DAATH...THE ABYSS, RANDOM CHAOS OF THOUGHT & CONCEPTION

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE Sefirot GO TO Elizer Segal's Website:

http://www.ucalgary.ca/~elsegal/Sefirot/Sefirot.html

  • Ein Sof, the Unknowable Infinite
  • Keter, the Divine Crown
  • Hokhmah, Wisdom
  • Binah, Understanding
  • Hesed, Mercy
  • Din, Justice
  • Tif'eret, Beauty
  • Nezah, Eternity
  • Hod, Glory
  • Yesod, Foundation
  • Shekhinah, The Shekhinah, God's Presence in the World
  • The Right Side
  • The Left Side
  • The Middle Column

  • http://www.borndigital.com/tree/    Another interactive Tree of Life Website  Qabala

     

     

    The centers are arranged in three columns. The left column is called the Pillar of Severity.

    This represents the female side of man and contains three sephira: Binah (Understanding), Geburah (Severity) and Hod (Splendor).

    The right column is called the Pillar of Mercy.

    This represents the male side of man and also contains three sephira: Chokmah (Wisdom), Chesed (Mercy) and Netzach (Victory).

    The middle pillar is called the Pillar of Equilibrium.
    It represents the balance between the male and female pillars.
    It contains four sephira:
    Kether (Crown), Tiphareth (Beauty), Yesod (Foundation) and Malkuth (Kingdom).

    The Kabbala requires four of these Trees, one for each world of the cosmos.

    The Four Worlds:

    Atziluth:
    Representing the archetypal world, pure Divinity, and Yod of the Hebrew Name of God.
    It corresponds to the Suit of Wands in the Tarot.

    Briah:
    Representing the creative world, the Archangelic, and thee in the Hebrew Name of God.
    It corresponds to the Suit of Cups.

    Yetzirah:
    Represents the formative world, the Angelic, and Vau is the Hebrew name of God.
    It corresponds to the Suit of Swords.

    Assiah:
    Representing the material world, man, and the final He in the Hebrew Name of God.
    It corresponds to the Suit of Spheres.


     

    Greater understanding of the Tree Of Life -

    Can be had if you view the image as multi-dimensional -
    Spinnning or rotating in whatever direction you see it.


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    What is Kabbalah anyway?  June 2003 - MSNBC


    Cheryl Glover
    Copyright ę 2002 by New Thought Kabbalah All rights reserved.
    Revised: 11 Oct 2015 23:54:31 -0400 .

     The 72 Names of God

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